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Learn More About Rehabilitation


Physical Therapists

Physical therapists (PTs) are highly-educated, licensed health care professionals who can help patients reduce pain and improve or restore mobility - in many cases without expensive surgery and often reducing the need for long-term use of prescription medications and their side effects.

Physical therapists can teach patients how to prevent or manage their condition so that they will achieve long-term health benefits. PTs examine each individual and develop a plan, using treatment techniques to promote the ability to move, reduce pain, restore function, and prevent disability. In addition, PTs work with individuals to prevent the loss of mobility before it occurs by developing fitness- and wellness-oriented programs for healthier and more active lifestyles.


Occupational Therapists

Occupational therapy practitioners ask, "What matters to you?" not, "What's the matter with you?" Occupational therapy practitioners have a holistic perspective, in which the focus is on adapting the environment to fit the person, and the person is an integral part of the therapy team.

In its simplest terms, occupational therapists and occupational therapy assistants help people of all ages participate in the things they want and need to do through the therapeutic use of everyday activities.

Common occupational therapy interventions include helping people recovering from injury to regain skills and providing supports for older adults experiencing physical and cognitive changes.

Occupational therapy services typically include:
  • An individualized evaluation, during which the client/family and occupational therapist determine the person’s goals,
  • Customized intervention to improve the person’s ability to perform daily activities and reach the goals, and
  • An outcomes evaluation to ensure that the goals are being met and/or make changes to the intervention plan.
Occupational therapy services may include comprehensive evaluations of the client’s home, recommendations for adaptive equipment and training in its use, and guidance and education for family members and caregivers.


Speech and Language Pathologists

The professionals who are educated to assess speech and language development and to treat speech and language disorders are called speech-language pathologists (sometimes informally referred to as speech therapists). Speech-language pathologists can also help people with swallowing disorders.

Speech-language pathologists assess, diagnose, treat, and help to prevent communication and swallowing disorders in patients. Speech, language, and swallowing disorders result from a variety of causes, such as a stroke, brain injury, hearing loss, developmental delay, a cleft palate, cerebral palsy, or emotional problems.


Rehabilitation Nursing

Rehabilitation Nurses provide quality medical care 24-hours a day. The rehabilitation nurse may instruct patients and their family on a number of topics related to your program. These topics can include medications, risk factors, accommodations, therapy planning and activities.